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, and that it should be abolished, regardless of what the laws of the state or the country said at the time. she came to brunswick because her husband got a job at bowdoin college. he stayed in ohio and and later moved to andover, in order to complete his contract there is a professor. she came without him with their children, and she was also six months pregnant. and she moved to brunswick in order to take up residency here, awaiting the arrival of her husband. the stories that were told of harriet beecher stowe is that she was a small and petite woman. she did not take much care in terms of how she dressed. but she was also very numerous for a woman of her time. she was known then mostly as a housewife. she wrote that she was totally overwhelmed with the number of children -- she had seven and she was pregnant -- that is what you would see as an overworked housewife and mother who came to worship here, probably with her children and her sisters, catherine beecher, and they all became members of this church. we first meet uncle tom in his hut. he is in a slave huts. he is learning to read the bible.
significant to link them. his support for lincoln's policies are very important in the story is just an law so i thought it was time somebody brought that story to light. >> we are the maine state library in a public reading room and were going the maine author's collection. in the early 1920s, henry tunick who is the state laboring at the time started collecting books by maine writers trying to get them signed whenever possible and it has grown into this. >> welcome to maine's capital city on booktv. with the help of our time warner cable partners or the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary culture of this area as we visit with local authors and explore special collections that help tell the history of not only this state but the country as well. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine and it's significant to the story of uncle tom's cabin. in many plays places stories began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23 that harriet beecher stowe by her account saw a vision of uncle tom dean clips to death. now uncle tom, as you probably know, is the title, the hero of her
rights. i'm sure there are some lawyers or law students here in the room, and when you read the book and you read legal documents about declaration, the accord in 1920, you understand that there are gigabytes, international 19 legal rights of jews to the land. but there's something else which i haven't found elsewhere when i wrote the book, and i call it the common sense right. when you go to a war and you win a war, you don't give land you wondering that were. and what's happening now, since we won the war, and the side that was aggressive and started the war is coming to us and saying, you know what? i want my land back. it doesn't work that way. even here in the u.s. when it was with mexico, and you want, nobody came to you and told you, you know what, we lost the war, we want our land back. and i think the common sense right is something that states very straight to you. and our neighbors should know that if they would start another war with us, they would not keep any price. on the contrary, if you lose, you lose. and i think talking about the right is something very important t
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